I think it’s bad news, but you may actually need to take a vacation this year.

It may be acceptable to leave the comfortable covid-19 cave and immerse yourself in sandy beaches and mountainous areas. Even more problematic is the begging to visit the old men at home, which may now be impossible to refuse.

Fortunately, you will still have to work. (You certainly don’t want to give your boss the idea that you can live without you — because they may just try.)

If your family vacation is creeping you up, visit The Washington Post. Here, Natalie B. Compton recently wrote “A Completely Correct Guide to Working Remotely with Family.”

Compton’s advice may be correct, but it’s almost not perfect. That’s where I come.

No. 1: Set expectations for availability

Sure, “you can’t expect your family to know the working day you’re staying in,” but unless your mom and dad have a degree in abnormal psychology, you’ll see your beloved child hanging from your laptop and sobbing alternately, laughing. You may be worried if you scream.

To alleviate the shock, “communicate when you can spend a fulfilling time together freely.”

From 5 am to 5:15 am is enough time for family unity. You will fall asleep, and your parents can spend their time finishing your laundry and stocking your favorite snacks in the fridge.

2: Be honest with yourself

According to psychologist Andrea Bonior, “it’s unrealistic to expect to get the whole life of work and bring it home without changing productivity.” this is true. Being far from the Xbox, Blankey, and stuffed animals, you can actually do a lot more work than you did at home.

This is a big problem. It could catch the attention of managers who can expect to continue this high level of productivity at the end of their vacation. This is only possible if your parents visit you and it will certainly be welcomed for only a year or two.

3rd place: Prepare for a barrage of distractions

Just because you live does not mean that your family’s life at home will stop completely. The blender will be blown up. The parakeet will be squeaky. Roomba grabs his toes.

You can buy noise-cancelling earphones, but they are expensive. You can get the same result by filling your ears with pasta. Fusilli is best, but it retains the pesto. Another solution is to “stay in a makeshift bunker.” A closet is recommended, but consider setting up a vacation office under the dining room table. This ensures privacy while at the same time getting closer to scrapping dinner with your family last night.

No. 4: Keep your inner teenagers away

Returning with your parents can bring out teenagers, even the most mature individuals, which I hate to tell you, you are not.

When returning to a rebellious and unpleasant teenager, Boniol recommends “walking, taking a deep breath, and stretching to relieve tension”.

Or you can go to your room, lock the door and shout that the world is unfair. (If this doesn’t work at home, try it the next time you’re in the office. You may turn to a top marketing job.)

No. 5: Follow the script to soften the discussion

This is mine: “Agree I disagree. It’s clear that I’m right and you’re wrong. And you’re an idiot. Come on, pass the beans.”

No. 6: Plan to get a good night’s sleep

Even a talented sleeper like you can have problems if you have to turn up the volume to 11 and listen to your parents’ stupid TV shows. You can use earplugs or melatonin. If you have already removed the fusilli, you can also get melatonin directly into your ears.

No. 7: Don’t treat your house like a hotel

It is important that you do not behave like a “competently hired parasite” unless your family may prefer to pamper you. We recommend that you leave a thank-you note, but we recommend that you add an invoice.

You don’t have to be crazy — it’s a standard hourly rate to enjoy your presence during your vacation.

Explain that you are not leaving until you receive the full payment. My guess: You won’t take long to wait.

Bob Goldman was an advertising executive for a Fortune 500 company.He provides a virtual shoulder for crying at

bob@bgplanning.com